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Poster: quigs Date: Jun 1, 2010 4:16pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

Here's another example, in 1936, Charles Chaplin released "Modern Times" a "silent film" . Sir Charles wrote the music for a silent film. Imagine the scene where the little tramp is going through the machinery of the factory; turn off the sound and it's a pretty dull film but with the music, it's one of the most hilarious sequences in it. Why? The music acts as an additional character of the scene-eliciting responses from the audience watching the film.

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jun 4, 2010 9:16pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

I can't let this one slide by. Ahem! Silent films were never intended to be seen without music and original scores date back at LEAST to "The Birth of a Nation." (Score by Joseph Carl Breil.) The premieres of the REALLY big films typically used full orchestras. The scores would be reduced for smaller ensembles as the films hit smaller venues until, in the smallest venues, the score would be a reduction for sole pianist/organist. That's usually how it worked. Also, it was standard to have a musician or two playing music DURING the filming, to set the mood - usually a violinist. There wasn't any consistency in any of this, though. As others pointed out, early sound films didn't exploit the full potential of recorded music. And, yes, Max Steiner's score to "King Kong" is regarded as a seminal point in film music. It wasn't until the arrival of Erich W. Korngold in the mid 1930s that the wall-to-wall approach we're used to arrived. Note: Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock's best regular composer, created an unsettling effect by NOT writing music for "The Birds." Creepy stuff, that.

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jun 4, 2010 9:16pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

I can't let this one slide by. Ahem! Silent films were never intended to be seen without music and original scores date back at LEAST to "The Birth of a Nation." (Score by Joseph Carl Breil.) The premieres of the REALLY big films typically used full orchestras. The scores would be reduced for smaller ensembles as the films hit smaller venues until, in the smallest venues, the score would be a reduction for sole pianist/organist. That's usually how it worked. Also, it was standard to have a musician or two playing music DURING the filming, to set the mood - usually a violinist. There wasn't any consistency in any of this, though. As others pointed out, early sound films didn't exploit the full potential of recorded music. And, yes, Max Steiner's score to "King Kong" is regarded as a seminal point in film music. It wasn't until the arrival of Erich W. Korngold in the mid 1930s that the wall-to-wall approach we're used to arrived. Note: Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock's best regular composer, created an unsettling effect by NOT writing music for "The Birds." Creepy stuff, that.

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Poster: quigs Date: Jun 4, 2010 9:38pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

Thank you B. Stockwell.

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jun 4, 2010 10:00pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

My pleasure. A really, REALLY great book on silent film - easy to read for something so definitive - is Kevin Brownlow's "The Parades Gone by . . .". Brownlow is probably the single most important figure in why we even have these films to see. He triggered in interest in the field and is "Mr.Restoration." A BBC fixture, he also does work for Turner Movie Classics. Golly, it must be fun to be smart like that.

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Poster: quigs Date: Jun 4, 2010 10:21pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Silent movies.

So true; but then again we have like yourself and others who understand there are more to films \an just sitting on your duff and watching the finished product: without knowing the time, sweat, labor, and hard work that goes into making those images on the screen that flicker by so fast the human cannot comprehend the still images and accepts them as moving pictures. Thank you for research and understanding.